• Loading…

What is D&AD?

Since 1962, D&AD has been inspiring a community of creative thinkers by celebrating and stimulating the finest in design and advertising. The D&AD Professional Awards are recognised globally as the ultimate creative accolade, entered and attended by the best from around the world.

But it's much more than just awards. Members join a vibrant global community, whilst creatives and clients are inspired by a world-class Training programme.

As a non-profit advertising association, all D&AD's surpluses go straight into programmes such as New Blood, inspiring the next generation of creative talent and stimulating the creative industry to work towards a fairer more sustainable future.

Everything You Need to Know:

The Backstory

In 1962 a group of designers and art directors come together to celebrate creative communication and raise standards within their industry.

Amongst the group are David Bailey, Terence Donovan and Alan Fletcher. Calling themselves British Design & Art Direction, the following year they organise their first Awards event. And they are picky. From 2,500 entries they select just 16 pieces of work to receive the soon-to-be coveted Yellow Pencil; the first of its kind. 

Today, British Design & Art Direction has grown mightily, but slimmed down its name. Now D&AD, its members represent the creative, design and advertising communities, not just in Britain, but worldwide.

D&AD is a Member-run organisation, led by an elected board. Meet our 2015-16 Trustees

Meet D&AD's Management Team

Where Does Your Money Go?

As a non-profit, D&AD takes all of its surplus revenues and invests them back into the creative industry. The funds from the D&AD Foundation are dedicated to funding programmes that develop the next generation of creative talent while campaigning for the creative industries to help solve the world's toughest social and environmental issues.

We have placed cookies on your computer to help make this website better.
You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue.

Don't show this message again