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Case Study: PUMA

In 2001, PUMA was facing a crossroads. The German brand that had been born out of the infamous Dassler family feud in 1948, which launched PUMA and Adidas, was in big need of rejuvenation.

After early successes with its sports footwear products through the sixties, seventies and eighties, the company found it had become less relevant to the urban youth market. The business was wedged between sports giants like Nike and Adidas, and the small, edgy footwear independents, that had spun out of the skateboarding and dance music scenes of the late eighties and nineties.

Ten years on and its rebirth is palpable by every measure. Not only has PUMA increased its brand value steadily in line with the major brands, (according to Brand Finance's annual Global 500 study); the brand has snapped up six D&AD Yellow Pencils to boot. Last summer, PUMA hit EURO 3bn sales for the first time, and with sprinter Usain Bolt as brand champion for Olympics year, 2012 is looking promising.

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