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D&AD New Blood Winners That Changed the Conversation

Every year, D&AD New Blood Pencil winners remind us what creativity is capable of. From campaigns that change the conversation to design that kickstarts dialogue, we've had a whole host of entries that prove it's not just about shifting products off the shelves.

So we've delved into the archive to celebrate work that's opened people's eyes, and worked hard to re-shape perspectives. There's everything from a campaign to rebuild a city's reputation, to a beauty range that stands up to stereotypes.

Scroll down for six pieces of creative inspiration that prove your ideas really can shift people's points of view.

We Are All Equal

How do you kickstart a conversation about the stereotypes that surround the beauty industry? With a range of products that ditches gender-specific messaging in favour of a stripped-back and straightforward approach. Targeting both men and women, the all. brand uses guerilla marketing to stand up to inequality in advertising, while promoting its own gender-neutral philosophy.

Award: Yellow Pencil / New Blood Awards 2016 / Design Bridge brief ​
Credits: Harry Burgess and Kristian Shepherd at University of Central Lancashire
​Tutors: Andy Bainbridge and Peter Thompson

Getting to Grips with Tap Water

We went way back to 2009 for this clever direct mail campaign, which uses a simple print solution to get people to reconsider tap water. The waxed paper folds into a drinking cone, which playfully emphasises the benefits of this mineral-rich source while reminding of the downsides of bottled water. Proof, if you needed it, that sometimes a single piece of paper is all you need to change people's minds.

Award: Yellow Pencil / New Blood Awards/ 2009/ Design Council brief ​​
Credits: Aaron McCarthy and Emily Churches at University of Gloucestershire
​Tutors: Frank Holmes, Jon Dytor, Rob Bowdery, Roger Lipscombe

Colours for Sarajevo

The setting for the longest military siege in modern history, Sarajevo has undergone extensive reconstruction. To help reboot the city's reputation, this campaign created a new Pantone palette that would restore colour to the city, but also introduce a new beginning for Sarajevo. To extend the conversation to the rest of the world, a website connects people to an automated paintball launcher which lets users live-paint bullet holes around the city and donate to the reconstruction effort.

D&AD New Blood Winners That Changed the Conversation

Award: Yellow Pencil / New Blood Awards / 2015 / Pantone brief ​​​
Credits: Joanna Sjostrand, Mayra Nunez at Miami Ad School New York and Miami Ad School Miami
​Tutors: Eric Kwan Tai Lau, Bradley Mikio, Samuel Shepherd

Expect the Unexpected

This 'leaked' video went to the extremes to combat perceptions of the National Trust as old-fashioned. Taking a risk on an entirely unexpected tone of voice – accompanied by a bonkers and boldly irreverent set of images – this film set out to loudly remind a younger demographic what they were missing out on. The campaign was so convincing, it even earned itself national press coverage and a social media thumbs up from the charity itself.

Award: Yellow Pencil / New Blood Awards/ 2014 / National Trust brief ​​​​
Credits: Robert Sewell and Vytautas Busma at University of Gloucestershire
​Tutors: John Brewer

Protecting Pubs

This campaign encouraged people to rethink their local boozer by positioning it as a key part of the community. Using the industry's vast typographic history to create an A-Z of beer mat fonts, the campaign set out to protect pubs from large developers by offering a completely new perspective on their contribution to culture.

​Award: Yellow Pencil / New Blood Awards/ 2016 / Monotype brief ​​​​
Credits: Neil Bennison at the University of Central Lancashire
​Tutors: Andy Bainbridge

Streetlines

How do you get commuters to reconsider their daily journey? By taking the iconic colours of London's tube lines, and transferring them to the actual streets of the city. This campaign encourages tube-travellers to reconsider walking as a transport option, with painted lines acting as a physical guide and visual reminder that tube stations are much closer than you might think. And to continue the conversation? Interactive billboards that capture and share the discoveries made on commuters' new by-foot journey.

Award: Yellow Pencil / New Blood Awards/ 2016 / Ford brief ​​​​​
Credits: Jamie Quantrill at Falmouth University
​Tutors: Jon Unwin

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